Thursday, October 29, 2015

Infamous guns at Auction

Two guns once owned by Bonnie and Clyde sold for over half a million dollars. Clyde Barrow's 1911 Colt .45-caliber automatic sold for $240,000.

Bonnie Parker's .38-caliber Detective Special that she had taped to her thigh when she was killed in a hail of gunfire in 1934 sold for $264,000 to the same bidder.

An online bidder paid $130,000 for a .45-caliber Tommy gun and $80,000 for an 1897 12-gauge shotgun that were seized from one of the duo's hideouts in Missouri in 1933.

Lawmen seized the weapons on April 13, 1933 after a bloody raid on an apartment in Joplin where the Barrow Gang were holed up. Two lawmen were killed while the gang escaped.

Al Capone’s Colt .25 semi-automatic pistol sold for over $ 16,000 in 2012.

His Colt .38 revolver sold for over $100,000 at a Christie's 2011 auction in London.
A gold-plated 7.65 Walther semi-automatic pistol with Hitler’s initials inlaid in gold on the ivory grips. It sold for $114,000 at a 1987 auction.

The pistol was taken by an American soldier during a dramatic attempt to capture or kill the dictator in Munich in the waning days of the war. Hitler was miles away in his bunker at the time.

John Dillinger's derringer, a miniature pistol that was found in the outlaw's sock when he was arrested in 1934 sold for $45,000.

The wooden gun Dillinger famously used to escape from the Crown Point, Indiana jail sold for $ 19,000.

A purse pistol Jesse James gave his wife, Zee, to commemorate the birth of their daughter sold for $20,000.

On October 5, 1892 five members of the Dalton Gang rode into the small town of Coffeyville, Kansas. After a failed bank robbery, the ensuing firefight killed four townspeople and four members of the Dalton Gang. $ 50,000.
Wyatt Earp's Colt .45-caliber revolver. $ 225,000. The revolver was passed down by the Earp family and is likely the one Wyatt used in the most legendary gunfight in wild west history, the O.K. Corral shootout — which became legend.

.44-caliber Smith & Wesson that killed Jesse James: $350,000. The James Gang terrorized Kansas and Missouri for nearly two decades led by the outlaw Jesse James.

The shot that killed James was delivered from a .44 which brought $350,000 at an Anaheim auction in 2003.
A tiny 6-inch derringer sitting in a display case at Ford’s Theatre National Historic Site is perhaps the most valuable in the world. Yet the only price ever paid for the item was around $25 in the mid-1800s, by John Wilkes Booth.

One shot was all Booth had to end Abraham Lincoln’s life when he entered the President’s theater box on April 14, 1865. Kept for generations as evidence by the War Department, the relic eventually returned to its fateful origins at the Ford Theatre where it had changed the course of history.